My workouts from the past three weeks. Feel free to ask-box me with questions about it. As a note, my weeks go from Monday-Sunday.
You can see my cycling skills skyrocket with my new bike, and my swimming skills vastly improved once I got my damn butt in the water. I seem to get particularly ripped up after a hard lifting session, so I need to learn to organize those better. I either go too hard, or expect that after a leg day I’ll be able to do anything. Putting lifting on Fridays and right before rest days seems to work best, as I’m usually biking on the weekends with my father or my biking buddy. I think this means I should be lifting on Mondays and Fridays, biking Fri/Sat/Sun, and fitting in all my swimming during the week in the mornings before lab.
If you want to look at the particulars of any workout for times or specific lifts, you’ll have to dig through my fitocracy profile.

My workouts from the past three weeks. Feel free to ask-box me with questions about it. As a note, my weeks go from Monday-Sunday.

You can see my cycling skills skyrocket with my new bike, and my swimming skills vastly improved once I got my damn butt in the water. I seem to get particularly ripped up after a hard lifting session, so I need to learn to organize those better. I either go too hard, or expect that after a leg day I’ll be able to do anything. Putting lifting on Fridays and right before rest days seems to work best, as I’m usually biking on the weekends with my father or my biking buddy. I think this means I should be lifting on Mondays and Fridays, biking Fri/Sat/Sun, and fitting in all my swimming during the week in the mornings before lab.

If you want to look at the particulars of any workout for times or specific lifts, you’ll have to dig through my fitocracy profile.

Today’s run is brought to you by Nine Inch Nails. This is one of their classics from Pretty Hate Machine, “Sin.”

1250m swim this morning and I just finished 8 miles outside. 90 degrees and cloudy, but ueber humid with the impending storm. It showered a bit while I was out there so my Kinvaras are currently drying with some scrap paper. I find right now that my butt hurts the most, hopefully not still residual from squat-urday last week.

Embettering

This is the word I like to use for making things better. You are embettering them. EM-better-ing. Easy.

Dad and I embettered (multiple tenses—I hope you like this, grammar nazis) our old habits together today. I remember as a kid, going go church with him on Sunday mornings and getting hot chocolate after. Going in the summer was the best, we could sit outside the church and listen to the music instead of being steamed in our shells, huddled next to neighbors in short pews. I am not a religious person by any stretch, so it was more of a conscientious moment of spending time together. I tried church and found that attending was not for me, so I stopped.

Today I got to relive that joy of hanging out with my dad alone. Instead of heading to church as we would when I was eight or nine, we went on a long bike ride together. After losing 60+ lbs and hitting 250 for the first time in at least a decade, my father is back on track towards getting fit. With the advent of my new bike, of course I was destined to be his compliancy buddy. I am totally pleased with that. My father was my fitness role model when I was just starting out a few years ago, and I’m glad to have caught up.

While we may not be ending with hot chocolate and Dunkins’ muffins, I’m glad I got to spend time with him, sitting on a bench in the town depot, resting for a minute at our half-way point and chatting before jetting off again. It reminds me of one of my uber-favorite running quotes:

It is better to be running in the mountains, contemplating god, than to be sitting in church contemplating running in the mountains.

20 miles biked, 9 ran

  • 56% humidity.
  • My ipod died, it is water logged. It’s not completely dead, but malfunctioning.
  • My friend Mariah found me and we ran together, she is wonderful and now I am exponentially happier than I was earlier—which was already pretty happy to begin with.
  • Kept the pace under 9:00 min/miles for most of my run.
  • I am now wetter than a swimming pool.
  • Happy Saturday, friends.

Thing I casually learned from riding my first road bike:

  1. Your partner will not be amused when you wake them up at 6:30 AM because you are a kid on Christmas. Especially if they are nocturnal.
  2. Don’t try to unclip while going slow. You will fall over immediately. I did not know this but I sure do know it now.
  3. When you DO fall over, you will unclip magically as you hit the ground.
  4. The bruises from biking (in my case, falling) will not coincide with your bruises from deadlifting, or those from walking into random things. Therefore you will be triply bruised and the guy at the Trader Joes’ you stop at to grab a snack will ask you if someone beats you. Make some funny quip and then pray he doesn’t call social services.
  5. You don’t need to ride your brakes down the hill—take a deep breath and be 100% sure that the hill you’re riding does not end in an intersection, because for some reason 99% of the steep hills around here end up converging with major streets. Terror.

I did the math and today is my 9th time on a bike in the past three years. Three of those rides were last week on my mountain bike. In light of this statistic, I think I’m doing pretty damn well.

Running In The Heat

I run in the middle of the day due to my work schedule. 70-105 degrees and baking sunshine is not uncommon. I still get it done, and so do a lot of other people according to this runners’ world page. For some reason I still get told that I’m crazy for running outside in the heat. Why? The heat can be conquered.

  1. Acclimate to the weather. AKA just get it done, because the more often you do it (and in hotter weather) the easier it becomes later. It’s like starting over again, but you get better, faster.
  2. Slow down. Your pace will drop at first (mine went from an 8:30 min/mile back to my 10 min/mile from last fall), but then will return to near-normal levels after you’ve gotten acclimated. Then, in the fall, you will probably run incredible times. Running through the summer/winter is 80% of what’s made me faster.
  3. Drink often, but not too much. Bring salts. Hotter weather = sweating more = losing more water and body salts = you gotta put them back in somehow. Gatorade is pretty good, but you can seriously dilute it and still get a good effect. Gus are also nice (but must be taken with water or else you’ll have cotton-mouth for the next 5 miles). You’ll get fatigued faster out there when it’s hotter, so you might need more fuel to begin with. Nuun has some great electrolyte tabs that are slightly fizzy and a great alternative to boring salt tablets.
  4. Keeping your face and/or wrists wet cools your body temperature. Washing your hands in cool water during a bathroom break will perk you up, and feels glorious.
  5. If you’re really a wimp, or it’s really really hot, fill a bandana with ice cubes and tie it around your neck. Stick a baseball cap in the freezer and take it out just before you head out. Or if it’s really bad, find a freezing-cold gym and hit the treadmill.

Running in the summer heat is not all that difficult to get used to, and once you do, it’s pretty enjoyable. The bike paths around me are always empty during the heat of the day, so I don’t have to fight with pedestrians for some pavement. Glorious.

If you don’t believe me that it’s doable, watch Running on the Sun, the documentary about the Badwater Ultramarathon which is 135 miles through Death Valley and up Mt. Whitney. There are videos circulating on youtube of participants training for this by running on home treadmills, in parkas, with the heating vent of a dryer directed straight into their home-made sauna.