Goin’ on a wet run. I sacrificed my dry run time to do some work for one of my employers earlier than scheduled. It rained the day of my sprint tri so wet training is probably a good idea :/
Also considering making a post of tri tips for newbs/overly-anxious individuals (like myself). Is that helpful or obnoxious?

Goin’ on a wet run. I sacrificed my dry run time to do some work for one of my employers earlier than scheduled. It rained the day of my sprint tri so wet training is probably a good idea :/

Also considering making a post of tri tips for newbs/overly-anxious individuals (like myself). Is that helpful or obnoxious?

7 hilly miles this morning, 7 hillier ones just now. 14 miles total for today, fitting since my long run was 12 last week.

I think this calls for 16 next week. A friend is running a half marathon on 5/12, maybe I’ll drop in? I don’t think I have enough funds for the $50 entry fee though. And I think my mom is going to want me home for Mother’s Day.

More sunburn from my hour run today (7 miles, 9:30/mile pace, my calves were really tight from 12 miles in my old nike free v3s Sunday and 0 foam-rolling yesterday). I have freckles everywhere. I like myself best when they all come out and wash out my acne scars and reflect all the hours I’m logging on my feet or bike outside.

Anonymous asked:

Hi! So I do track and field in the spring for my school, and I'm interested in doing cross country in the fall. Right now I can only run 3 miles on my own without burning out completely . I do mostly sprints as my events, but I'd like to get into distance and hopefully as I get older be able to do 5ks and marathons! How often a week should I run and for how long to train for cross country, where we normally run around 3-6 miles for practice daily??

I’m not your coach (or a professional, I just run a lot) so I would ask your coach first—they will know what your strengths are from your past seasons on spring t&f and what specifically you need to work on, things I don’t know about you. :)

In the end, getting better at running further requires running more. Try adding a day onto your schedule, increasing in mileage by 5-10% for 3 weeks with a 4th as a “deload” week (the general rule of thumb for increasing mileage). Even if you only run an extra 10 minutes on your added day, that is an increase and will help you get better. As far as how long to train, the mileage you put in over the summer will build a strong base for running in the fall.